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Posts Tagged ‘winter fun facts’

The colder parts of America can be challenging in the winter. There are months that are snowy, windy and brutally cold. Feelings about winter are divided. Some people embrace the winter. They love the serenity, the peace and quiet that comes along with winter. The comfort of being indoors is an opportunity to develop close relationships with the people around us. Relax indoors with some hot soup and tea by spreading out a lace tablecloth (or any white tablecloth) that is snow white for a nice winter effect.

heirloom white tablecloth

Some people like to brighten things up. They see winter as dark and dreary and love to bring some color indoors. Calming colors such as blue and green are great mood enhancers. A place mat or a table topper in such a color will certainly brighten up those days!

Elizabeth Placemat

Here are some interesting Fun Facts for Winter:

A single snowstorm can drop 39 million tons of snow, carrying the energy equivalent to 120 atom bombs!

Snow comes in a variety of colors, yellow, orange, green and even purple. Actually, it’s colorless but it can contain dust or algae that give it different colors. Orange snow fell over Siberia in 2007 and pink snow (watermelon snow) covered Krasnodar (Russia) in 2010. Watermelon snow is common in mountains and has a sweet smell and taste.

Pink snow, watermelon snow, may be pretty and sweet smelling, but it frequently contains nasty algae that will make you sick. Source: Wikipedia

It was believed that Eskimos had dozens of words for snow. However, some linguists showed that they have the same number of root words as English. Then other linguists showed that they really did seem to have more words. Now there is a hot debate about snowy words.

The Inuit/Eskimos should get together with snowboarders. Skiers are always using different words, such as “pow pow,” “mashed potatoes,” “champagne snow (powder),” “cauliflower,” “sticky snow,” “dust on crust” to describe the snow.

According to Guinness World Records, the largest snowflakes on record were 15 inches (38 cm) in diameter and 8 inches thick. They fell on Fort Keogh, in eastern Montana on 28 January 1887. Nearby ranchers described the flakes as “larger than mild pans” and measured them; “8 inches thick”.

Let us know what you think-do you enjoy the winter or just can’t wait for spring?

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